Valentino for GAP: first look

The designer-for-chainstore collaboration concept seems to be having a (somewhat premature) revival. Not that it ever went away – but that it’s had a burst of new-found vigor. First Lanvin for H&M hit stores; now it’s the Emperor himself Valentino with a collection for GAP.

The idea is the same. A lower-quality, mass produced take on designer items bringing them to a wider consumer base. Yet Valentino’s collection feels a little different. We’ve not seen the dumbed-down versions of Valentino’s sweeping evening gowns that we might have expected. Rather it’s a fresh approach of using staple GAP elements like heavyweight cotton in kahki and army green, cargo pants, parkas and cotton basics – but reinterpreted with Valentino’s signature ruffles.

Valentino for Gap

Click the thumbnails for full pictures:
Valentino & GAP A/W '10 Look Book
Valentino & GAP A/W '10 Look Book
Valentino & GAP A/W '10 Look Book
Valentino & GAP A/W '10 Look Book
Valentino & GAP A/W '10 Look Book
Valentino & GAP A/W '10 Look Book
Valentino & GAP A/W '10 Look Book

The end result is yet more of the military trend; but at that a fresh, feminine take that can be used to extend the trend’s lifespan a little longer.

Visit GAP.

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Some people's wardrobes are about a small selection of pieces that all fit within one aesthetic - Tania Braukamper isn't such a person. With a wardrobe that spans three different rooms, her approach to fashion is a mixture of current-season key pieces mixed with vintage finds she's sourced on innumerous shopping trips around the world's more cultured capitals. Despite a disparate approach to shopping, Tania is adamant that the key to mixing vintage with new season is to stick to key looks and colours that work for oneself. And it's a theory that she works into her writing for Fashionising.com, where she serves as the publication's Editor.