In search of lost time

“Like souls, ready to remind us, waiting and hoping for their moment, amid the ruins of all the rest; and bear unfaltering, in the tiny and almost impalpable drop of their essence, the vast structure of recollection.” — Marcel Proust

Remi Rebillard knows how much I love a story, and luckily for me he’s always willing to tell one – no matter how deep or how small – about some moment, some mood, some memory that either inspired or surrounded his work. This time it was a Proust-like moment: the “involuntary memory” described famously as rushing over Proust at the taste of a tea-soaked madeleine. These polaroids, Remi tells us, quoting the above, are the madeleine behind his Proust-like epiphany.

Remi Rebillard polaroids

Click the thumbnails for full pictures:
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard
Polaroids by Remi Rebillard

The polaroids, lost to a dust-collecting corner and more recently found, were snapped in Remi’s voyages across Seychelles, Mauritius and the Bahamas in the 1990s. Some faces you may recognise, but only the people in the them and the man behind the camera can experience that involuntary memory of salt and sand and sea that comes flooding back at their sight.

The memories may not be waiting amid the ruins to remind us of these times, but we can none the less enjoy the collection of photos. You can view them at the gallery above.

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Some people's wardrobes are about a small selection of pieces that all fit within one aesthetic - Tania Braukamper isn't such a person. With a wardrobe that spans three different rooms, her approach to fashion is a mixture of current-season key pieces mixed with vintage finds she's sourced on innumerous shopping trips around the world's more cultured capitals. Despite a disparate approach to shopping, Tania is adamant that the key to mixing vintage with new season is to stick to key looks and colours that work for oneself. And it's a theory that she works into her writing for Fashionising.com, where she serves as the publication's Editor.