Like Magritte’s famous Son Of Man, Diane von Furstenberg’s spring campaign model is somewhat faceless. Or, obscured at least. It’s another notch on the belt of surrealism in fashion, channeling not just Magritte but backed by cracked desert and cloudy skies that are distinctly Dali-esque.

But Furstenberg isn’t questioning reality or the human condition; her model isn’t faceless by some societal symbolism. The point is to prompt you to insert your own face onto this anonymous Daughter of Man. Hence the slogan: “Be the woman you want to be.” Don’t just look at that model and wish you could be her, it implores; transpose yourself into her shoes and be her.

The thing about Furstenberg’s campaign, though, is that the facelessness makes it ironically less easy to relate to. Humans respond to faces, and odds are you’ll find your eyes drawn away from the clothes to where the face should be, because your brain knows something is wrong and it trying desperately to fill in the gaps. But the anonymity level is so high that you can’t.

diane von furstenberg ss12

Click the thumbnails for full pictures
Diane von Furstenberg S/S '12 Campaign
Diane von Furstenberg S/S '12 Campaign
Diane von Furstenberg S/S '12 Campaign
Diane von Furstenberg S/S '12 Campaign
Diane von Furstenberg S/S '12 Campaign
Diane von Furstenberg S/S '12 Campaign
Diane von Furstenberg S/S '12 Campaign
Diane von Furstenberg S/S '12 Campaign

The marketing team behind Camilla Akrans’ photographs probably knew this and didn’t particularly care – even if you can’t mentally step into the faceless model’s body, the campaign wouldn’t have gone unnoticed. Perhaps that was the real goal.

View the rest of Diane von Furstenberg‘s spring 2012 campaign at the gallery above.

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Some people's wardrobes are about a small selection of pieces that all fit within one aesthetic - Tania Braukamper isn't such a person. With a wardrobe that spans three different rooms, her approach to fashion is a mixture of current-season key pieces mixed with vintage finds she's sourced on innumerous shopping trips around the world's more cultured capitals. Despite a disparate approach to shopping, Tania is adamant that the key to mixing vintage with new season is to stick to key looks and colours that work for oneself. And it's a theory that she works into her writing for Fashionising.com, where she serves as the publication's Editor.