Cat eye glasses trend

Having jumped on this bandwagon long before I ever got the chance to write about it, I figure it’s more than time to fortify the status of cat eye glasses as a 2011 fashion trend. So without further ado let’s take a trip back in time as we explore the ’50s eyewear phenomenon as it was then, and how to translate it to today’s look.

giles deacon cat eye glassesCat eye sunglasses at Giles Deacon, SS11

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Click the thumbnails for full pictures:
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration
Retro sunglasses: picture inspiration

Cat eye glasses: the trend

Far from being a stand-alone trend, the resurgence of cat eye glasses and cat eye sunglasses is rooted firmly in the revival of ’50s and early ’60s fashion. Some designers featured them prominently in Fall – Prada, notably – and since then a plethora of alternatives have surfaced.

prada cat eye glassesPrada AW10 cats eye glasses

The trend towards ’50s sunglasses continued on the spring 2011 runways: from the extreme retro frames at Giles Deacon and Jeremy Scott through to subtle cat eye shapes at the likes of Paul Smith, Tommy Hilfiger, and Twenty8Twelve.

jeremy scott cat eye glassesCat eye glasses at Jeremy Scott, SS11

Cat eye glasses and face shapes

Generally speaking a cat eye frame with rounded-out edges will work wonders for a square face or diamond shaped face. A round face can benefit from sharper edges, or large frames that curve upwards subtly. All that said though, the rules are never hard and fast: the best option is always to try, try, try on pairs until you work out what’s right for your face shape and hairstyle.

cat eye glasses at paul smithCat eye sunglasses at Paul Smith SS11

How to wear cat eye glasses

Get the right pair of 50s-inspired glasses or sunglasses and you’ll find they can work with many an outfit, from the very modern to the utterly vintage. If you’re going for a vintage inspired look, stick to anything from the ’40s through to the ’60s. While ’70s fashion is also seeing a major comeback, it’s an era best suited to round frames.

anna dello russo cat eye sunglassesAnna Dello Russo in cat eye sunglasses

Cat eye spectacles

For those afflicted, it’s useful to see myopia or hyperopia as an opportunity to accessorise, rather than as a disadvantage. And why shouldn’t we? Specs have become the accessory du jour even for those who don’t require them. So regardless of whether you wear glasses by necessity or by choice, remember that an on-trend pair are the way to go. And retro glasses are definitely the way to go right now.

If you want to make a strong statement, try a pair of cat-eye or harlequin glasses with diamond-shaped lenses that point sharply out. For an everyday pair pair that will last, keep low-key and subtle with a slight flare out at the edges.

Images: Vaness Jackman, style.com, nymag.com.

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Some people's wardrobes are about a small selection of pieces that all fit within one aesthetic - Tania Braukamper isn't such a person. With a wardrobe that spans three different rooms, her approach to fashion is a mixture of current-season key pieces mixed with vintage finds she's sourced on innumerous shopping trips around the world's more cultured capitals. Despite a disparate approach to shopping, Tania is adamant that the key to mixing vintage with new season is to stick to key looks and colours that work for oneself. And it's a theory that she works into her writing for Fashionising.com, where she serves as the publication's Editor.